All posts by Diljeet Bhachu

Diljeet Bhachu is a PhD researcher in the Reid School of Music at the University of Edinburgh. Her research interests include equality, diversity and inclusion in music education, musical identities and creativities. Diljeet is also a freelance musician and administrates Play On, an inclusive instrumental instruction programme run by Paragon Music. She is drawing on this inclusive music experience in her PhD research, which is exploring community music principles in the Primary classroom with non-music-specialist classroom teachers.

The International Journal of Inaccessible Jargon: A research dissemination gap.

As a research student, I regularly attend research training sessions and other such events. A running theme in many of these sessions has been ‘impact’ – more specifically, how can we create impact with our research? Who might benefit from our research? How can we engage with them?

What is impact? 

Earlier this year I attended a training session on “Evaluating your Digital Impact”, run by the Scottish Graduate School for Social Science. The aim of this training was to make us aware of how we can evaluate our research impact, and identify ways of disseminating our research. J. Britt Holbrook’s list of 56 Indicators of Impact (featured on the LSE blog) shows that impact is measurable in more ways than counting how many times your work is cited. Furthermore, Holbrook identifies that impact – which is so often talked about as a positive outcome – can also be controversial or negative.

Last week I was in Keele, at the first PG conference held by the AHRC North West Consortium. In his keynote, Professor Charles Forsdick suggested a shift is needed, away from talking about ‘impact’ – which in the REF is encountered as a short-term result rather than the long-term impact more applicable to the arts and humanities – towards a focus on public engagement and knowledge exchange.   I find this helpful, particularly as a musician and music PhD student, as it suggests more of a dialogue between research and society.

Continue reading The International Journal of Inaccessible Jargon: A research dissemination gap.

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