All posts by Dr Katherine Williams

Dr Katherine Williams is Lecturer in Music at Plymouth University. Prior to her appointment in 2014, she lectured at Leeds College of Music and Cardiff University, and taught on various modules at the University of Bristol. Throughout her musicological study (BMus King's College London, MA and PhD University of Nottingham), Katherine maintained an active profile as a saxophonist, performing and teaching in the idioms of classical, jazz and new music. Katherine's research has been published by Jazz Perpectives, Journal of Music History Pedagogy, and Jazz Research Journal (forthcoming 2014). Her first monograph is in production with Equinox Press, and she is co-editor of the Cambridge Companion to the Singer-Songwriter (forthcoming 2016), and the Singer-Songwriter Handbook (Bloomsbury Academic, 2017). She regularly presents her research at national and international conferences: recent and forthcoming highlights include popMAC (Liverpool University, July 2013), Royal Musical Assocation (London, September 2013), Verdi's Third Century (New York University, October 2013), New Jazz Conceptions (University of Warwick, May 2014), On Collecting: Music, Materiality and Ownership (University of Edinburgh, July 2014), IASPM-UK (University College Cork, September 2014), EuroMAC (Belgium, September 2014), Art of Record Production (Oslo, December 2014), and Society for American Music (California, March 2015).

Conflict and Coherence: Thinking About Idiomatic Interplay in Music

This March, I attended the International Festival of Innovation at Leeds College of Music . The conference brought together several strands of research and practice, including Popular Music, Classical Music, Leeds International Jazz Education Conference, and the International Festival of Innovation in Music Production and Composition.  In previous years, these strands have been run as separate conferences, and I have been involved with the Leeds International Jazz Education Conference for several years. To my mind, bringing together these events was an inspired move: scholars and practitioners from each field were able to network and share ideas, and delegates frequently found there was more in common between the disciplines than they had previously thought.  Dr Zack Moir (@zackmoir) and I got talking at a coffee break, and ended up having an impassioned discussion about new methods of teaching music. We agreed that practical musicianship can be informed by theoretical and historical understandings, and vice versa.

Continue reading Conflict and Coherence: Thinking About Idiomatic Interplay in Music

Share Button