Category Archives: Ambiguity

The International Journal of Inaccessible Jargon: A research dissemination gap.

As a research student, I regularly attend research training sessions and other such events. A running theme in many of these sessions has been ‘impact’ – more specifically, how can we create impact with our research? Who might benefit from our research? How can we engage with them?

What is impact? 

Earlier this year I attended a training session on “Evaluating your Digital Impact”, run by the Scottish Graduate School for Social Science. The aim of this training was to make us aware of how we can evaluate our research impact, and identify ways of disseminating our research. J. Britt Holbrook’s list of 56 Indicators of Impact (featured on the LSE blog) shows that impact is measurable in more ways than counting how many times your work is cited. Furthermore, Holbrook identifies that impact – which is so often talked about as a positive outcome – can also be controversial or negative.

Last week I was in Keele, at the first PG conference held by the AHRC North West Consortium. In his keynote, Professor Charles Forsdick suggested a shift is needed, away from talking about ‘impact’ – which in the REF is encountered as a short-term result rather than the long-term impact more applicable to the arts and humanities – towards a focus on public engagement and knowledge exchange.   I find this helpful, particularly as a musician and music PhD student, as it suggests more of a dialogue between research and society.

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Six things that I REALLY like about music

1. Music is Simple

Striking a bell creates a beautiful resonance; it swells and then fades to silence. Bizarrely, we find the experience beautiful. Music really is so simple. Make things vibrate and enjoy the consequence, that’s it! Overanalyse it and miss the point?

Now for an analysis:

Much of our western harmonic system can be thought of in terms of the harmonic series, which is simply whole number multiples of a common fundamental frequency.

An Octave – 1/2 (yes, pedants it’s the reciprocal)
A Perfect 5th – 2/3
A Perfect 4th – 3/4
A Major 3rd – 4/5

Don’t let yourself be fooled by the language in Ramou’s Treaties on Harmony (1722) or the The Lydian chromatic concept of tonal organization for improvisation (Russell, 1961), underneath are simple primary-school fractions.

Composers and musicians from Mongolian throat singers to Nigel Osborne understand this powerful simplicity and utilise it with varying degrees of consciousness and sub-consciousness. It seems we are innately tuned in to these ratios that nature has handed us. Nevertheless, simple systems give rise to emergent complexity.

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Turn the Beat Around

In a previous post I talked about ‘keeping the beat’, while rhythmically shifting melodic motifs and accents.  One way of shifting  was to pre-ordain it through the process of pulse preserving polymeter, as exemplified by Led Zeppelin’s Kashmir and Stavinsky’s Three Pieces for String Quartet. However, Stravinsky didn’t only use such prearranged processes to create rhythmic displacement; in fact more often he would also just do it.

Histoire du Soldat and Thelonious Monk:

Again, Histoire du Soldat provides some of the best examples of this, partly because, as Lambert said, all those marching band rhythms and pseudo polkas and rags make the pulse emphatically clear.

Here is one of my favourite examples from Histoire:
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Make ’em Clap to This: Tricks of rhythmic displacement as found in Stravinsky and Led Zeppelin

(NB The following is related to this post – you might want to have a look if you are interested in the subject of rhythmic ‘tricks’)

Writing in the early 1930’s, composer/critic Constant Lambert takes great delight in recounting the following incident at a Ballet Russes performance:

“Diaghilev included as a symphonic interlude Mozart’s Musical joke……no one saw the joke except Diaghilev himself. His entourage took the piece with perfect gravity as an example of classicism to be admired and imitated.”

(Lambert, p98)

I’m sure he exaggerates – he was, after all, decrying Stravinsky’s brand of neoclassicism (Lambert was more an admirer of the “barbarism” of The Rite of Spring and Les Noces, and caricatures Stravinsky’s move to neo-classicism as a “spectacular sinner” having a “spectacular conversion.”

“….they (the audience) craved more sensation- very well they should have it. Cold water and sermon for them…Stravinsky in his latest works has achieved a final triumph of fashion….a fashion for boredom”

(Lambert, p88)

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